Docherty

By William McIlvanney

Synopsis

At the end of 1903, in a tough, working-class town in the West of Scotland, Tam Docherty`s youngest son, Conn is born. Tam is determined that life and the pits c won`t swallow up his boy the way it has him. Courageous and questioning, Docherty emerges as a leader of almost indomitable strength, but in a close-knit community tradition is a powerful opponent.

Year of Publication

Review

Forget the “Father of Tartan Noir” tag that has been put on McIlvanney’s work. Docherty, his third novel, is a serious, considered and achingly sympathetic engagement with the people whose only trace in the historical record is birth and death notices. He conjures a mining community as it vanishes with its values. He commemorates a white-knuckled decency and a red-faced self-mastery. -- Stuart Kelly

Author Biography

William McIlvanney is one of Scotland's foremost writers whose award-winning novels include LAIDLAW, THE PAPERS OF TONY VEITCH, THE BIG MAN, which was made into a film starring Liam Neeson, STRANGE LOYALTIES, and THE KILN. He has also published a volume of short stories, WALKING WOUNDED, three books of poetry and a collection of essays and journalism, SURVIVING THE SHIPWRECK. He lives in Glasgow.